When you use THESE words, you automatically appear smarter

You are as you speak! So if you want to impress others, you should include those terms in your vocabulary. Sound just incredibly smart!

Admittedly, it is not always appropriate to cheat with foreign words, and one does not always have the goal of acting like a little Einstein. Because sometimes that can not come true. However, there are situations where we want to be able to stand out through our language, for example in job interviews or upscale events. If you do not use it anyway, here are some magic words that will make you look pretty smart.

eloquent

Use this word and you are automatically yourself. Because Eloquent means “eloquent” and increases the IQ by 100 percent!

Obsolete

“That’s superfluous!” you can replace now and then with “This is obsolete”.

affect

The phrase “This affects me peripherally” has already made it to cult status. So it does not look silly, you can just say “That does not really affect me”. It means: “That does not bother me / does not affect me”.

adequate

Keeping something “adequate” instead of “fitting” or “appropriate” automatically sounds like intelligence beast!

aversion

Sure, against an honest “I really like fucked football” is nothing wrong. But there are situations where a “I have an aversion to football” may be more appropriate – and much more effective!

conversation

“I just wanted to do conversation.” Sounds a lot smarter than “I just wanted to chat a bit”

Imply

“That implies that he likes dogs” is a nice alternative to “That means automatically that he likes dogs”

Torpedo

If someone wants to prevent something, he “torpedo” something. Sounds alien with a lot smarter, right?

renitent

He never does what the boss says? Then he is “renitent” We find: Pretty cool word to look smarter!

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